Love God, Repent

Love God, Repent

Sermon Notes

Main Idea of the Series: To be the greatest church, we must follow the greatest commandment from the greatest person.

Key Thought: In the Jewish calendar, the new year (called Rosh Hashanah) begins a season of reflection and repentance. The first ten days in their new year are focused on confessing sin so to reconnect with God and others. Coming to terms with our sins shows us our need for God in the first place.  This period of contrition was an important preparation for Yom Kippur, the highest and holiest day for their year.

While we are no longer obligated to obey the law, we can still learn some things from it. One key lesson is that renewing our love and commitment to God must first begin with repentance. This often over-looked topic makes an appearance all through the biblical library. But we see it best depicted in Psalm 51. Here David pours out his heart before God

Here’s the problem- we are allergic to self-reflection and inventory. Several problems in our modern world keep us from this.

  • We overwork
  • We pursue distractions
  • We drink too much
  • We blame-shift
  • We rationalize

Yet, we should normalize this important discipline for:

  • Jesus’ ministry began with repentance (Mark 1:15)
  • The church’s ministry began with repentance. (Acts 2:38)

So, the first expression of our love to God in 2022 should be repentance.

Supporting Points: Psalm 51

  1. Repentance begins with a clear understanding of wrongs committed. (1-5)
  2. Repentance recognizes that true cleansing comes from God. (1,2, 7-8)
  3. Repentance reveals a new hunger for the things of God (vs. 10-11)
  4. This results in changed actions. (13-15)

When we pass over the process of repentance, we actually short circuit the process of a changed heart. Psalm 51:18-19

Application:

Write your own Psalm

  • Here’s What I did
  • God, here’s what I am asking you to do about my sin
  • Here’s how I feel now that I have embraced your grace
  • Here’s what I want to do for you as our hearts are aligned

TALK IT OUT:

  1. As we begin each New Year we often focus on making resolutions of how we want to live differently next year, however, Pastor Rusty points out that the Jewish Near Year called Rosh Hashanah, began with a season of reflection and repentance. How is repentance and reflection different from New Year’s resolutions? 
  2. Pastor Rusty makes the point that a period of contrition offered important preparation for Yom Kippur, the highest and holiest day of the year. Why is repentance and reflection important to us approaching God? 
  3. Many things in our modern world tend to keep us far away from healthy self-reflection and inventory. Pastor Rusty lists these: 1) Overwork, 2) Distractions, 3) Drinking, 4) Blame-shifting, 5) Rationalization. Which one or ones from this list keep you from serious contemplation about yourself and your relationship with God? 
  4. Jesus’ ministry began with repentance according to Mark 1:15. In addition, the church’s ministry started with repentance as well in Acts 2:38. Why does repentance seem like such a foreign concept to many believers in 2022? 
  5. Repentance begins with a clear understanding of wrongs we have committed (Psalm 51:1-5). Why is this foundational for true repentance? 
  6. Repentance recognizes that true cleansing comes from God (Psalm 51:1-2, 7-8). Based on this, what is the consequence if we fail to acknowledge our sin to God? 
  7. Repentance reveals a new hunger for the things of God (Psalm 51:10-11). How might this explain why so many today have so little interest in God? 
  8. The result of repentance is changed actions (Psalm 51:13-15). Pastor Rusty notes that when we don’t practice repentance we short circuit the process of a changed heart (Psalm 51:18-19). How have you seen these principles demonstrated in your own life? 

LIVE IT OUT

  • Write your own Psalm which should include the following four components: 
    • Here is what I did
    • God, here’s what I’m asking you to do about my sin
    • Here’s how I feel now that I have embraced your grace
    • Here’s what I want to do for you now that our hearts are aligned 
  • After writing your Psalm, use it as the basis for a personal prayer of repentance. 

Fill Out the Scroll (See Below)

TALK IT OUT:

  1. As we begin each New Year we often focus on making resolutions of how we want to live differently next year, however, Pastor Rusty points out that the Jewish Near Year called Rosh Hashanah, began with a season of reflection and repentance. How is repentance and reflection different from New Year’s resolutions? 
  2. Pastor Rusty makes the point that a period of contrition offered important preparation for Yom Kippur, the highest and holiest day of the year. Why is repentance and reflection important to us approaching God? 
  3. Many things in our modern world tend to keep us far away from healthy self-reflection and inventory. Pastor Rusty lists these: 1) Overwork, 2) Distractions, 3) Drinking, 4) Blame-shifting, 5) Rationalization. Which one or ones from this list keep you from serious contemplation about yourself and your relationship with God? 
  4. Jesus’ ministry began with repentance according to Mark 1:15. In addition, the church’s ministry started with repentance as well in Acts 2:38. Why does repentance seem like such a foreign concept to many believers in 2022? 
  5. Repentance begins with a clear understanding of wrongs we have committed (Psalm 51:1-5). Why is this foundational for true repentance? 
  6. Repentance recognizes that true cleansing comes from God (Psalm 51:1-2, 7-8). Based on this, what is the consequence if we fail to acknowledge our sin to God? 
  7. Repentance reveals a new hunger for the things of God (Psalm 51:10-11). How might this explain why so many today have so little interest in God? 
  8. The result of repentance is changed actions (Psalm 51:13-15). Pastor Rusty notes that when we don’t practice repentance we short circuit the process of a changed heart (Psalm 51:18-19). How have you seen these principles demonstrated in your own life? 

LIVE IT OUT

  • Write your own Psalm which should include the following four components: 
    • Here is what I did
    • God, here’s what I’m asking you to do about my sin
    • Here’s how I feel now that I have embraced your grace
    • Here’s what I want to do for you now that our hearts are aligned 
  • After writing your Psalm, use it as the basis for a personal prayer of repentance. 
  • Fill out the Scroll

Fill out the Scroll

Psalm 51